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Anti-Idiotarian Rottweiler » Time For An Exit Strategy
TOKYO, Jul. 10, 2006 (AP Online delivered by Newstex) — Japan said Monday it was considering whether a pre-emptive strike on the North’s missile bases would violate its constitution, signaling a hardening stance ahead of a possible U.N. Security Council vote on Tokyo’s proposal for sanctions against the regime.

Could be. Of course, sitting on their hands doing nothing while the poofy-haired midget perfects his nukes could very well end their existence. So what to do? Risk a Constitutional crisis or risk total nuclear annihilation?

Tough choices.

Of course, the mere thought of Japan defending herself from nuclear holocaust has people up in arms, among them the South Koreans???

South Korea, not a council member, has not publicly taken a position on the resolution, but on Sunday Seoul rebuked Japan for its outspoken criticism of the tests.

“There is no reason to fuss over this from the break of dawn like Japan, but every reason to do the opposite,” a statement from President Roh Moo-hyun’s office said, suggesting that Tokyo was contributing to tensions on the Korean Peninsula.

[Chief Cabinet Secretary Shinzo] Abe said Monday it was “regrettable” that South Korea had accused Japan of overreacting.

Seriously, people. His Majesty has just about had it with our so-called “allies”, the South Koreans, running interference for the Pissant of Pyongyang, particularly because we know full well that the only reason they’re not concerned is the presence of our troops as a trip wire there.

So why don’t we just pull our GIs out? It’s not like they’re all that well-loved by the ingrate South Koreans anyway, and it’s certainly not like we couldn’t find a better use for them elsewhere. Then we could send a diplomatic note to Kim No Dong-Ill saying “we’re gone. Have at it.”

Oh, and subsequently lambast the South Koreans for “over-reacting” when the Commie Cluetard starts amassing his tanks and artillery for an assault all along their nothern border, of course.

How do you like them apples, Roh Moo-Moo?

Asswipe.

17 Responses to “Time For An Exit Strategy”
  1. Unregistered Comment by tweell

    We don’t have all that many troops in South Korea now anyways. What’s there is on the DMZ, and would be hammered if hostilities began. These guys know that they are there as a tripwire/sacrificial pawn, which doesn’t help morale at all. The only worry I have over that is that Kim Klueless will undoubtedly think we are running away from his demonstrated Dong-less might. Perhaps Japan would be interested in hosting these troops, if we sweeten the deal with bunches of Patriot batteries? Kimmie will still crow, but everyone will know the real deal.
    Next, could Bush ask the Japanese to modify the constitution that Dougout Doug imposed on them and remove the military limitations? My father went to war against the Japanese, I would be honored if my son went to war alongside them. NK and China are almost certainly going to be adversaries in the next WW.

  2. Emperor Darth Misha I Comment by Emperor Darth Misha I UNITED STATES

    We don’t have all that many troops in South Korea now anyways. What’s there is on the DMZ, and would be hammered if hostilities began. These guys know that they are there as a tripwire/sacrificial pawn, which doesn’t help morale at all.

    Exactly. Trust me, I know the feeling only too well from the Cold War. We knew that we wouldn’t be around to see the end of open hostilities, that we were only there to slow Ivan down and make sure that everybody else would HAVE to respond as a result of our sacrifice.

    Of course, there was the important difference that WE signed up to die for something worth dying FOR and, frankly, given the South Koreans’ behavior, they’re not worth giving the time of day anymore, even if they ask nicely, much less dying for.

    Which is why we should pull our troops out. We don’t have a monolithic Evil Empire that we have to contain at all costs anymore, so the result of a rational cost-benefit analysis is invariably in the red, particularly considering how the South Koreans never miss an opportunity to show their gratitude by bitching at us.

    The only worry I have over that is that Kim Klueless will undoubtedly think we are running away from his demonstrated Dong-less might.

    True. Not that we could possibly do or say anything to avoid Ding-Dong reaching whatever psychotically deluded conclusion his syphilitic brain could think up, but we’d definitely have to make it abundantly clear that we were leaving because A) it’s clear that the South Koreans aren’t all that thrilled about our presence and B) with the Soviet Union no longer an issue and our most favored trade nation status with China, there simply is no reason for us to waste time dealing with an internecine squabble anymore, particularly not in view of A). We’re not retreating, we’re simply realizing that we’ve outstayed our welcome and that there’s no rational reason for us to stay either.

    Next, could Bush ask the Japanese to modify the constitution that Dougout Doug imposed on them and remove the military limitations? My father went to war against the Japanese, I would be honored if my son went to war alongside them.

    I’ve been thinking that myself for a LONG time. That’s the deal we offered the Germans, after all, so why shouldn’t we offer the same to the Japanese?

    I KNOW that the PTO was more personal to the U.S. than the ETO, for obvious reasons, but if we can move on with the Germans responsible for some 20 million deaths, surely we can do the same with the Japanese? I mean, come on, it’s 60 years ago and the Japanese have done nothing since then to make us doubt their sincerity, ferchrissakes.

  3. Unregistered Comment by mhjhnsn

    South Korea hates Japan for their long occupation (ca. 1910-1945)…plus, the South figures some day they’ll reunify with the North and be an instant nuclear power.

    None of which should mean a damn thing to us.

    Our troop presence and commitment MAY incline South Korea to be less likely to cozy up to China, and if so, that may justify their presence because after the Islamists are taken care of, there will still be China to be reckoned with… hopefully in peaceful competition but the military threat, long-term, is certainly there.

  4. LC Tremor Comment by LC Tremor UNITED STATES

    Misha,

    I’m going to have to respectfully disagree with your take on the South Korean response and the underlying reasons for it.

    The South Koreans have a very tough row to hoe with regards to the NorKorComms, principally because they view the Norks as adversaries, but also as brothers, in the literal sense of the word. Let us not forget that after the armistice was signed many families were split thanks simply to which side of the line they were on at the time of the signing. They would very much like to see a peaceful reunification because face it, who wouldn’t have a hard time killing their own brother? Yeah, it’s a very idealistic way for them to look at things, but if it can happen in East/West Germany, why not hope for a similar solution here?

    Also, the South Koreans aren’t running interference in their opposition to a pre-emptive strike. The thing is that the Koreans have a long memory and they tend to hold a bit of animosity towards the Japanese for the fact that the Japanese invaded them and treated them like shit 100 years ago. They just don’t like the idea of them launching shots anywhere in their direction, as well as the first item.

    And despite what you may hear in the G-d Awful media, the vast majority of South Koreans are very supportive of and thankful for our presence there. A couple hundred (or even thousand, for that matter) clueless, uninformed college miscreants who have yet to fulfill their compulsory service (all male South Koreans are required to serve 2 years minimum) do not represent the views of the population any more than our own moonbat minority does here.

    That said, I’m not saying that actions shouldn’t be taken, or even that actions aren’t being taken… Personally, I think having a few Aegis Cruisers in the area is only the first step… Add in a nice wall of Patriots, and promise that anything lobbed in that direction will be intercepted, viewed as an attack, and responded to with the full might of US, Japanese, South Korean, (and any other willing allies) military retaliation. Make it a no shit suicide deal for Jonger. But that’s just my take on it…

  5. Unregistered Comment by LC Jon, Imperial Hunter UNITED STATES

    Make it a no shit suicide deal for Jonger.

    It’s that “no shit” part whith which so many US pols and diplodinks have a serious nonrelationship.

    The Big Stick is useless if you aren’t willing to use it. What would Reagan do? I’d bet that if he were in charge right now, a great many of our adversaries would be soiling themselves… or dead.

  6. Emperor Darth Misha I Comment by Emperor Darth Misha I UNITED STATES

    Hi, LC Tremor, good to see you again! You’ve been gone for too long, my friend!

    You offer a lot of excellent points, so let me offer a few observations from my side of the fence as well:

    The South Koreans are deeply suspicious and pissed off at the Japanese for what they did to them?

    Understandable, I have no issue with that feeling. Trust me, the country in which I was born has quite a few issues with the Germans along the very same lines. But life goes on, and nations change. The past is no place to live in, which is why I’m damn glad that the Bundeswehr were on our side during the Cold War. They’re damn good soldiers and, besides that, we needed all the help we could get to stare down Ivan. Not to mention the fact that they, like the Japanese, never once gave us any reason to doubt that they’d changed after the well-deserved ass-kicking they got in 1945.

    Side note: The Germans, too, seem to have forgotten how much they owe Uncle Sam for 1945-1990, so we probably ought to let them fend for themselves as well.

    The South Koreans hope to be re-united with their brothers and sisters in the North one day?

    I understand that perfectly, and I can empathize a lot. The southern part of Denmark, Sønderjylland and Schleswig-Holstein, used to be Danish too, right up until 1864. We settled that with a vote in 1920, Schleswig-Holstein wanted to be German and Sønderjylland wanted to be Danish and all is well, but we didn’t get Sønderjylland back until that vote after 56 years of German occupation, so I know what you’re talking about.

    Or, to use an even better analogy, why don’t we take the West Germans vs. the East Germans (prior to re-unification)? I, obviously due to where I grew up, knew a lot about how West Germans felt about their lost families in the East, and they were quite passionate about it, something I certainly never faulted them for. They, too, were torn from their families as a result of war and an arbitrary line and they, too, missed what had been taken from them and longed to be back together.

    But they didn’t side with the enemy. They knew what they wanted, and sucking up to the East German dictatorship wasn’t it. They, too, were faced with the unenviable position of having to fight their own in case of a conflict, but they also knew that even that would be better than being re-united under a communist banner, so they stood firm. They didn’t run interference for the Soviets when they threatened us with nuclear annihilation. They knew what side of the bread was buttered and they stuck with it. They, too, remembered what the U.S. and Britain had done to them during WWII, they had the ruins around them to remind them, but they also knew that those former enemies were their best shot at ever getting re-united, so they sided with their former enemies and stuck with it.

    If the South Koreans don’t get that, then they deserve to duke it out on their own. At least they won’t have to side with former enemies when they’re turned into slaves of a communist dictatorship. That’ll be an enormous relief and comfort to them when they, too, are reduced to scrounging trash heaps for leftovers to eat.

  7. Unregistered Comment by Patton UNITED STATES

    The trouble is, currently we don’t have an anti-missile net in the area. So if Japan launchs a pre-emptive strike and fails (the JSDF is not paticularly strong), South Korea will be nuked for it. They, natrually, do not want that to happen.

  8. LC Tremor Comment by LC Tremor UNITED STATES

    Thank you, your Highness. I have been away too long… Leave it to the Emperor to pen just the words to cause me to pipe back up.

    I know what you are saying with the “we need to stick together” idea when we are facing bastards like this, and I agree. I don’t think the South Korean response is, “siding with the enemy” though I understand your reasoning behind, and support for said statement. If my last post was any indication, I think the Japanese are at the very least stepping in the right direction… The real challenge at this point is to convince the South Koreans that the right way to go about this is to stand tall and united against Jonger for the best results. At this point, I think they are still in the mindset that they can wait it out. Now, more than ever I would say that is not the right mindset and rather than give it all up, we need to make sure they realize the ramifications of what they are doing, and get them on the bandwagon. We’ve paid a sizable price in American blood to allow a South Korea to exist, and I don’t think we ought to pack it all in on account of a few waffling politicians.

    The other problem, of course, is finding the right pressure points on China and Russia to get them to either sign on (fat chance) or get the hell out of the way. To hell with the *spit* UN *spit*, I just don’t want the slimy S.O.B.s propping the NorKs up any more…

    Side note: We could indeed leave the Germans now, (and given the betrayal of 2003 they’d half deserve it*) but of course they don’t have the specter of Ivan still looming on the other side of the line to mar our conscience.

    Patton, the real problem with the JSDF is that “DF” portion… They are a defensive force in nature. Which means that they don’t have quite the right stuff for a full on offensive strike on their own. This makes their idea of a Japanese preemptive strike a little dangerous. Their military capability makes the chance for success questionable at best, and could force a situation that leaves us in a less than desirable strategic position. However, I do know for a fact that while the JSDF don’t have a missile net, the RoK does, courtesy of USFK… So if anyone has the defensive gap, it’s the JSDF

    *I say half because the Southern Germans, particularly in Bavaria, are still of a reasonably conservative/traditionalist slant that they are still pretty much pro-USA.

  9. juandos Comment by juandos UNITED STATES

    Remember this among others?

    AFP, Sunday 3 June 2001, 5:47 PM
    SEOUL, June 3 (AFP)—Thousands of South Korean radical students staged anti-US protests Sunday, accusing the administration of President George W. Bush of heightening tension on the Korean peninsula.

    In the biggest anti-American demonstration here since Bush took office in January, 7,000 students urged the United States to revise what they called a hardline and hawkish stance toward North Korea.

    Scuffles erupted when riot police set up tight human barricades with plastic shields and blocked the students from marching to the US embassy.

    (there is more)

    anti US protests Korea

    From the Wednesday, 11 December, 2002 anti-US protests

    Yes, let’s pull out…

    Korea sucks anyway…

  10. Emperor Darth Misha I Comment by Emperor Darth Misha I UNITED STATES

    The real challenge at this point is to convince the South Koreans that the right way to go about this is to stand tall and united against Jonger for the best results. At this point, I think they are still in the mindset that they can wait it out. Now, more than ever I would say that is not the right mindset and rather than give it all up, we need to make sure they realize the ramifications of what they are doing, and get them on the bandwagon.

    Oh, don’t get me wrong: I WANT them on the bandwagon. I just don’t want them to be the spoiled brat sitting in the back seat screaming for ice cream and potty stops every five minutes.

    And I do believe that I have the solution to those screaming students. Send them north of the DMZ. If they love Ding-Dong so much, they should be made to live under him.

    Then the rest of us could get on with business without having to wipe their spoiled little barely educated moronic asses every time they soil themselves.

  11. juandos Comment by juandos UNITED STATES

    And I do believe that I have the solution to those screaming students. Send them north of the DMZ. If they love Ding-Dong so much, they should be made to live under him

    Bingo!

    Ever on top of your game Misha!

  12. Deathknyte Comment by Deathknyte

    I wanted to pull our troops out of Korea back in the 90’s before no-dong even started launching rockets.

  13. MrSpkr Comment by MrSpkr UNITED STATES

    Ever notice how are so-called friends like South Korea and Germany “demand” we reduce our military’s strength and power, but whine like little girls when we suggest taking their advice by closing down bases in THEIR countries?

    Uncle Sucker is EVERYBODY’S sugar daddy — there for a quick fix of cash, and all the while despised by those who line up to get their piece of the action. Screw ‘em.

  14. Unregistered Comment by wdarty UNITED STATES

    The question is whether South Korea can build a new Seoul beyond the range of North Korean artillery before the North Koreans can build a reliable delivery system of nukes to the U.S. west coast.

  15. Xystus Comment by Xystus

    We could indeed leave the Germans now, (and given the betrayal of 2003 they’d half deserve it…I say half because the Southern Germans, particularly in Bavaria, are still of a reasonably conservative/traditionalist slant that they are still pretty much pro-USA.

    And an apparent home of my paternal-line ancestors–& a fine place regardless.

    Es lebe dem Freistaat Bayern!

    Vivat Bavaria!

  16. Unregistered Comment by CKO1986 UNITED STATES

    “So why don’t we just pull our GIs out?”

    Good question. And I’ve got a good answer:

    Because such a pullout would encourage the PRC to try something funny with Taiwan–to say nothing of the morale boost it would give Iran and al-Qaeda.

  17. LC Tremor Comment by LC Tremor UNITED STATES

    And you’d definitely get no argument from me on that edict, your Rottieness… I’ve often told commie lovers that if they love it so much, why not leave this bourgeois corrupt system for the worderful “worker’s paradise” that is Jongerland. I’ve even offered to help pay for the plane ticket, I’m so anxious to get the assholes out of my country… Saddly, no takers yet. I too think the South Koreans who agitate so vigorously for a US pullout should be sent to North Korea to witness the starvation, state-imposed terror, and sheer misery that is shared by the NorKs.

    BTW, did anyone happen to catch that CNN Presents special this past weekend on North Korea? It was surprisingly good, with some info on the budding resistance movement inside, and how many NorK’s are starting to get information in and out of the country via camera equipped cell phones.