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Anti-Idiotarian Rottweiler » Archive for The Long War
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Archive for the “The Long War” Category

Since the time of Imperial Rome man has gone to war with dogs by his side. In those barbaric days war dogs were unleashed to thin the enemy line and strike fear in their hearts. There was no thought to the dogs well being or to his other innate abilities, only the strength of is jaws, the sharpness of his teeth, and the viciousness of his heart.

Today we have a different relationship with our war dogs. They are valued as fellow soldiers and Marines, as special warriors with exceptional and unique skills. Their wounds are tended and their futures provided for. And it is an investment well worth the expense. Since WWII, war dogs have demonstrated their invaluable skills and devotion to their handlers. Their keen sense of smell could detect an ambush or sniper, and they could actually hear the wind “singing” across booby trap trip wires. Being more in tuned with their instincts, the could sense things that even the most combat experienced grunt would miss. There is the story of the Army dog handler in Viet Nam who received a new war dog, a rambunctious and stubborn German Shepherd. War dogs were in constant demand and the handler found his self on point with a dog who seemingly refused to listen to his commands. Moving through a field the dog would guide left, then right, going his own direction and ignoring the handler, who found his self along for the ride, as was the platoon following them. When they had crossed the field the platoon commander called a halt and approached the dog handler, who braced himself for an ass chewing of monumental proportions. Instead, the Lieutenant praised him and his dog for avoiding all of the mines and booby traps that his men had found at every “undisciplined” turn the dog had made. Later in his tour the same handler lay exposed and wounded in the middle of a firefight. The rambunctious Shepherd grabbed his LBE gear with his teeth and pulled him to safety. He then covered the handler with his own body and took five rounds that would have hit him instead. That kind of bond is as deep as any bond shared between men in combat. One such bond has come full circle this week.

Give us more, O Emperor! »

Comments 15 Comments »

I’m sure many of you know of Pat Dollard. For those of you who don’t, the short version is that he was a Hollywood type who wanted to know the truth about Iraq, so he went and embedded with a Marine LAR platoon, on his own dime.

He filmed his time over there and has been working on a documentary about it. It is all real, unscripted, unpolished true life shit. Pat was able to get the Marines to accept him as one of them, and is evident in the film clips I have seen by the fact that they were themselves when the camera was rolling. No forced smiles. No guarding every word, no inhering distrust so evident when grunts speak to the “Media”. In fact as I watched some of it, it was like I was back in the Corps. Pat became one of them and was nearly killed in an IED attack that killed the Marines sitting on either side of him.

Pat wants to get the truth out about our brave men and the truly great work they have done, and are doing over there. Problem is that he apparently is having some “creative differences” with his producer. Pat is unequivocal about how the film will portray the Marines and his time with them. It has become his mission in life to make this documentary.

Short version of all this is that Pat needs $3,000 by Friday to keep his documentary alive. Trust me on this pups, this story needs to get out. So if y’all can find it in your hearts this Christmas season, why don’t ya help a brother out and shake loose a few shekels for a good cause. (h/t to Mike M for the heads up).

Comments 16 Comments »

In Unsung Glory #3 you read the story of Lt. Michael Murphy receiving the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions during an ambush of his SEAL team in Afghanistan. Of his four man team, only one man, Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Marcus Luttrell survived the firefight and began an amazing journey of escape and evasion until he was finally rescued on the night of July 2, 2005 with the help of some Afghani villagers. But it was not just the Afghanis who helped him that dark and moonless night.

The United State is somewhat unique in the way it values it’s fighting men. Most have probably heard the phrase “No man left behind”, but it is truly a catechism of the American Military that we will do what ever we can to bring a warrior home, dead or alive. So much so that an entire science of Combat Search And Rescue has been developed.

When it was learned that Petty Officer 1st Class Luttrell, who is now called “The One” in the SEAL community, was still alive, a full court press to rescue him was launched, the largest CSAR mission ever launched in the Afghanistan Campaign. As has been done so often in the past air crews sprang into action determined to bring him home.

Give us more, O Emperor! »

Comments 11 Comments »

[”Stickied” to the top of the page because it’s bloody well needs to be. The usual incoherent rants from yours truly will appear below this post for today — Emp. Misha]

I promised Joe D a story about a paratrooper many weeks ago. Well, better late than never.

Heroism comes in many forms. Often times it involves saving your buddies lives while under fire, other times it is one courageous act which turns the tide of battle, maybe even the war. All of our warriors are doing their part to win the war, and much of the time the impact of their individual service can not be seen. It is easy to tell that you have won an engagement, you possess the field of battle and the only enemy remaining are the corpses bleaching in the sun. That is a visible indicator of progress. Other signs of victory are harder to immediately see. The candy bar you give to a child today may only bear fruit when he becomes of voting and military age and decides whose side he is on.

Sometimes though just a soldiers natural love for children in a war zone can transcend even his death and continue to have a positive impact on the real future of Iraq, the children watching our soldiers everyday.

Give us more, O Emperor! »

Comments 25 Comments »

Nothing particularly unusual about this story (link thanks to LC Azygos), but that’s exactly why stories like these need to be told again and again.

It’s quite helpful to remind the Oprahfied Instant Gratification Generation™ just what kind of beasts we are at war with, because it seems to us that they keep forgetting that Michael Moore’s Minutemen are subhuman scum that need to be put down whenever and wherever they’re encountered, by ANY MEANS AVAILABLE TO US.

Unless, of course, the ADHD’est Generation would prefer to start thinking about issuing Uzis to school crossing guards here in the U.S. one day:

BAGHDAD - Three suspected al Qaeda militants, including two sisters, beheaded their uncle and his wife, forcing the couple’s children to watch, Iraqi police said on Friday.

The militants considered that school guard Youssef al-Hayali was an infidel because he did not pray and wore western-style trousers, they told police interrogators after being arrested in Diyala province northwest of Baghdad.

The three cousins executed Hayali and his wife Zeinab Kamel at the all-boys school in Jalawlah in Diyala province, village police chief Captain Ahmed Khalifa said.

So they chop the heads off of a man and his wife while the children are watching because he wore western-style trousers?

And those are the animals that some of the more moronic specimens among us want to “dialogue” with???

The only way we should “dialogue” with those cave-dwelling pisslamic animals is through high-velocity munitions delivered in large and generous quantities whenever we hear as much as a whisper of a ululation.

If the dumbasses in DC want to talk with those creatures, then they’d damn well better devote some time to locating Dr Doolittle first.

Kill them all.

No mercy, no forgiveness, no peace, no negotiations.

Kill. Them. All.

Religion of “Peace” our Imperial Arse.

Comments 19 Comments »

Yeah, and I have some lovely beach front property in Siberia for sale too. So we are winning the war, our troops are successful on the battlefield, and the Democratic Congress has approval ratings lower than Rosie O’Donuts at a VFW. What ever is a defeatist journalist to do?

Simple. Cook the desertion rate to show how demoralized and beat down our troops are.

It’s a shame the actual numbers show the MSM to be the lying surrendercrats they are.

H/T LC Rurik for the link.

Comments 22 Comments »

A while back I commented on Michael Yon and the story of St. John’s Church in Baghdad.

Well in more continued stories of success that the Dinosaur media won’t tell you because it doesn’t aid them in their quest to see us defeated in The Long War, Yon brings us a heart warming update. St. John’s is open for business and the local Muslims want their Christian neighbors to come home.

Go read the story, and then keep the great news of our and the Iraqi’s continued success with you today, and say a prayer of thanks that Good can, and will, beat Evil.

Comments 7 Comments »

The Distinguished Service Cross is the second highest award for valor that the U.S. Army can bestow for battlefield heroics. Only the Medal of Honor ranks higher in precedence. Since the Viet Nam War ended in 1975, only six have been awarded. At a presentation in the Pentagons Hall of Heroes on Friday November 2nd the total was raised to seven.

Secretary of the Army Peter Geren presented the DSC to 1st Lt. Walter B. Jackson for actions while he was a 2nd Lt. serving in Al Anbar Province with Company A, 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry. On September 27th 2006 his unit was engaged in fierce combat when one of his vehicles was disabled. While attempting to retrieve it he and his soldiers came under intense machine gun fire and several of his men were wounded.

2nd Lt. Jackson, a West Point graduate from Oak Harbor Washington, began treating the most severlely wounded of his men until he himself was hit in the thigh. Temporarily knocked unconscious from the blood loss, when he came to he alternated between returning fire and tending to the wounds of his soldiers.

He was hit again while helping to carry one of his men to safety. Despite his own grave wounds, 2nd Lt. Jackson’s first concern remained with his men,  and he refused medical attention until he was sure they had been properly cared for.

After receiving the  DSC 1st Lt. Jackson humbly thanked his West Point classmates and the soldiers he has served with. Stereotypically modest about his own heroics, 1st Lt. Jackson simply said “I believe I just had to do what I had to do in that situation… I think many soldiers would have done the same thing.”.

1st Lt. Jackson has undergone more than a dozen surgeries while recovering from his wounds at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He is currently awaiting orders to assume command of an MLRS platoon with the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea.

 walterbjacksondsc.jpg                            dsc.jpg            

With the plethora of media outlets feigning righteous indignation anytime some peasant dares to question their support of our troops, one would be inclined to think that a soldier receiving the nations second highest award for valor would be all over the pages of the media right?

Well, outside of the blogosphere, exactly one media outlet carried the story. The Army Times.

Comments 12 Comments »

LC’s and G.L.O.R’s, meet Andrew Bolt, an Australian conservative and blogger.

Feel free to drop in on his blog anytime to comment, but mind your manners.

You can read more great articles here

The war in Iraq has been won

By Andrew Bolt
November 02, 2007

THERE is a reason Iraq has almost disappeared as an election issue.

Here it is: The battle is actually over. Iraq has been won.

I know this will seem to many of you an insane claim. Ridiculous!

After all, haven’t you read countless stories that Iraq is a “disaster”, turned by a “civil war” into a “killing field”?

Didn’t Labor leader Kevin Rudd, in one of his few campaign references to Iraq, say it was the “greatest … national security policy disaster that our country has seen since Vietnam”?

You have. And you have been misled.

Here is just the latest underreported news, out this week.

Just 27 American soldiers were killed in action in Iraq in October - the lowest monthly figure since March last year. (This is a provisional figure and may alter over the next week.)

The number of Iraqi civilians killed last month - mostly by Islamist and fascist terrorists - was around 760, according to Iraqi Government sources.

That is still tragically high, but the monthly toll has plummeted since January’s grim total of 1990.

What measures of success do critics of Iraq’s liberation now demand?

Violence is falling fast. Al Qaida has been crippled.

The Shiites, Kurds and Marsh Arabs no longer face genocide.

What’s more, the country has stayed unified. The majority now rules.

Despite that, minority Sunni leaders are co-operating in government with Shiite ones.

There is no civil war. The Kurds have not broken away. Iran has not turned Iraq into its puppet.

And the country’s institutions are getting stronger. The Iraqi army is now at full strength, at least in numbers.

The country has a vigorous media. A democratic constitution has been adopted and backed by a popular vote.

Election after election has Iraqis turning up in their millions.

Add it all up. Iraq not only remains a democracy, but shows no sign of collapse.

I repeat: the battle for a free Iraq has been won.

Now the task is one familiar to every democracy, and especially any in the Middle East: eternal vigilance.

If you doubt my assessment of Iraq, ask Osama bin Laden.

Al-Qaida’s media arm last week released a video on the internet in which bin Laden - or a man masquerading as him - revealed how disastrously his war against democracy in Iraq was going.

He called for intensified fighting against the Americans and pleaded for Muslims in the region to come help.

“Where are the soldiers of the Levant and the reinforcements from Yemen?” he demanded.

“Where are the knights of Egypt and the lions of Hejaz (in Saudi Arabia)? Come to the aid of your brothers in Iraq.”

Bin Laden even let slip how badly al-Qaida has been mauled by the Sunni sheiks who have stopped fighting the US troops and turned on bin Laden’s killers instead, by pleading for “unity” from the Sunnis and admitting “mistakes” had been made.

Take that as an admission of defeat for the terrorists, and a sign of victory for Iraq and its liberators.

To talk like this will, I know, choke many critics of the war with fury.

How angry so many are to hear good news from Iraq. And how suspicious is their reaction. Don’t we all actually wish for Iraq to be democratic, safe and free from tyranny?

But, they’ll splutter, but, but, but…

I can hear them already.

But the bloodshed in Iraq is terrible! Call that victory?

And, yes, the killings are ghastly. Iraq is nowhere near safe, and our help is still needed to make it so. Yet the violence now does not threaten the country or its government.

Go back to the days when American forces were fighting Muqtada al-Sadr’s Mehdi army for control of Najaf, or al-Qaida and its allies for Fallujah.

Such battles for territory are over. Al-Sadr has maintained a ceasefire for more than two years, and is even part of Iraq’s Government.

American troops are now based in his Shiite heartland of Sadr City, and no Iraqi city is now under terrorist control as Fallujah once was. “Insurgents” rule nowhere.

But we went to war on a lie!

Actually, we went to war to free Iraq from a tyrant who had used weapons of mass destruction, and would not guarantee he would not do so again.

No lie. Job done.

In any case, whatever you may think of the arguments put in 2003, the argument today is whether Iraq will survive as a democracy, and whether we should help it.

The answers must be yes, and yes. Mustn’t they? Hello?

But if Iraq is “won”, why are so many Iraqis still dying?

Because some of the killers are just criminals, or are trying to kill their way to a piece of the action, or are - inevitably after so much cruelty and oppression - settling scores.

Others are agents of Iran, which wants to make America pay and Iraq obey.

And more - and the worst - are fanatics who just want to kill for their creed, and are killing Iraqis as they are killing Pakistanis, Algerians, Egyptians, Israelis and anyone else in the way of their jihad.

Iraq remains an ugly place, with lethal hatreds, yet none of these killers are winning and Iraq will not fall to them.

Consider: Iraq’s official estimate of civilian deaths from violence is now about 25 a day.

In South Africa, with twice the population, the official murder toll is 52 a day. That’s a rate of killing equal to Iraq’s.

Do you think those murders will topple South Africa?

And does anyone say of South Africa that these killings just prove freedom was not worth it?

But how can you call this winning when Iraq’s power supply is terrible, its police untrustworthy, its regions divided over how to share oil revenues, and its borders threatened by Turkey, which wants to hit back at Kurdish terrorists encamped in Iraq’s north?

True, Iraq has plenty of problems. Which Arab country does not? But it will solve them better without Saddam than with.

And perfection is nowhere.

But, but, but … but it wasn’t worth it! See how many died!

And here is the only objection that can be made with integrity.

Yes, people have died, mainly at the hands of fellow Muslims. How many, no one knows.

Perhaps 100,000 since the war in 2003? More?

A ghastly loss, and thank God the killings are at last dwindling.

But Iraq was no Eden under Saddam. If the deaths today are bad, the misery before was worse.

As, of course, was the threat.

The battle for Iraq always involved a grim calculus: would liberation save more people than it killed?

So let’s calculate how many died under Saddam.

In 1980, the dictator invaded Iran, starting a war in which at least 500,000 people died. In 1987, he crushed the Kurds, killing perhaps 100,000 or more.

In 1990, he invaded Kuwait, starting a war that killed more than 23,000.

On his defeat, he killed some 100,000 Shiites who rebelled.

Add the mass executions he ordered, the purges he unleashed, the opposition activists he shot, the terrorist attacks he paid for.

Remember also the children who died, robbed of medicines by his regime.

Add them all up, and even by the most conservative count you see Saddam did not just threaten the West, but cost the lives of more than 100 Muslims a day, every day, for the 24 years of his barbaric rule.

That’s four times more than are being killed in Iraq today, often by Saddam’s heirs and Saddam’s like.

Was Iraq worth it? Yes. It stands, it stays, and the winning of Iraq was worth it, indeed.

Comments 23 Comments »

Still more signs of continuing success in the “quagmire” of Iraq. Remember the “good ol’ days” when the MSM idiots loudly proclaimed that Al Quaeda had re-taken Ramadi? I somehow doubt that they will be as quick to trumpet this news.

This month last year I was embedded in Ramadi with 1st Battalion 6th Marines as they kicked in doors, fought insurgents, and began to clear the city block by block. It cost the lives of a lot of good Marines, most under age 25, but their efforts and sacrifice convinced a few local citizens that the Marines understood the difference between “Iraqi’s” and “Al-Quada” — and so the charismatic Sheik Sattar Abu Risha formed the Sons of Anbar, and began co-operating with LtCol William Jurney’s young Marines.

What a difference a year makes.

Back in the day I knew Lt. Col. Jurney. He was a young Lance Corporal at the time, getting ready to go to OCS. It seems that he has done quite well since then eh? Lt. Col Jurney and his aggressive tactics and keen understanding of the Iraqi culture, combined with an expert application of COIN tactics has turned the most violent city in Anbar province, if not all of Iraq, into a blossoming symbol of our eventual victory in this war.

There is more electricity in Ramadi than any other city in the country, normally including Baghdad. Schools have re-opened throughout the city; the two grade schools once guarded by Alpha Co. 1/6 today have 2,000+ students studying daily. They ran a 5K race through the center of the city in September, as a way of announcing to the world that “Ramadi has survived.”

I would say not only survived, but flourished. But how could this be? Give us more, O Emperor! »

Comments 23 Comments »