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Comments on: Keystone Kops Karnival Of Komedy http://www.nicedoggie.net/2007/?p=1468 Tue, 16 Jan 2018 19:29:50 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.3.2 By: LC Hardclimber54 http://www.nicedoggie.net/2007/?p=1468#comment-56474 LC Hardclimber54 Thu, 27 Dec 2007 13:07:47 +0000 http://www.nicedoggie.net/2007/?p=1468#comment-56474 <strong>AyUaxe</strong> <blockquote>I knew locally who had one kinda over-did an inverted, tree-top level pass and wound up turning the canopy into a cuisinart, if you catch my drift.</blockquote> Wow, even the most highly trained acrobatic stunt pilot would NOT try an idiotic move like that!!! The simple, natural loss of energy and resulting drift always present in any manoeuver guaranteed he was going to clip the grass an inch too short... I always told our newly arrived "Tom Cruise's" in our squadrons "gentlemen, as good as your training was, as good as your ongoing training will be, you will NEVER be as good as you think...". Well, I spoke from experience, having clipped a few branches off a couple of tree three years prior... (previously post refers). Confidence, a must, arrogant stupidity, I'll pass... <strong> sig94</strong> <blockquote>The luck comes in two parts: 1) when you survive your mistake, and 2) someone (who doesn’t have his head up his ass) is there to tell you what you were doing wrong.</blockquote> Hear you loud and clear! Like the squadron leader (fought during WWII as a Typhoon pilot, even brought down a V1 rocket!) who, four months before he retired, told us how important to become your own severe teacher and let ourselves be reprimanded by our sixth sense. Example, climbing into the clouds, rate of climb 30,000 ft per min. and not properly using your radar or paying EXTREMELY close attention to ground control about traffic into which corridor you'll be crossing on your way up to angel sixty... It hurts even more when an airliner radios in and asks about the cowboy that just zip 1/2 of a mile in front of his bird in a 80 degree hardclimb... and the offending pilot didn't see him!!! (I can't claim "credit" on this particular dozy, another newly arrived pilot pulled that one, but I have my share of "Ooops"...). He stated afterwards that he did see the approaching liner on the radar, but figured his rate of climb was sufficient to allow a separation of at least 2 miles... Ground had advised the airliner of the scrambling fighter on their 12, but took too long to see the rapidly diminishing distance between the two aircrafts. Only after the fighter had passed close to the airliner did the Ground control warned the fighter. It became my job afterwards to "debrief" the young officer on this close call by reminding him that although HIS rate of climb had been considered and factored in, he had NOT taken into consideration that the airliner was NOT standing still and was moving forward at 300 KIAS, thus rapidly cutting the distance. The only proper course would have been to bring his aircraft to the right and move away immediately OUT of the corridor the airliner was using as soon as he his radard gave him indication of a collision course instead of relying on his ROC and ignoring the traffic advisory given by Ground control. Also his angle of climb was unnecessary steep, a climbing angle of 60 degrees would have done the same thing and brought him to his intercept coordinates just as quickly and safely... Live and learn... Strict Standards: call_user_func_array() expects parameter 1 to be a valid callback, non-static method emotions::filter_text() should not be called statically in /home/misha/public_html/2007/wp-includes/plugin.php on line 59

AyUaxe

I knew locally who had one kinda over-did an inverted, tree-top level pass and wound up turning the canopy into a cuisinart, if you catch my drift.

Wow, even the most highly trained acrobatic stunt pilot would NOT try an idiotic move like that!!! The simple, natural loss of energy and resulting drift always present in any manoeuver guaranteed he was going to clip the grass an inch too short…

I always told our newly arrived “Tom Cruise’s” in our squadrons “gentlemen, as good as your training was, as good as your ongoing training will be, you will NEVER be as good as you think…”. Well, I spoke from experience, having clipped a few branches off a couple of tree three years prior… (previously post refers).

Confidence, a must, arrogant stupidity, I’ll pass…

sig94

The luck comes in two parts: 1) when you survive your mistake, and 2) someone (who doesn’t have his head up his ass) is there to tell you what you were doing wrong.

Hear you loud and clear! Like the squadron leader (fought during WWII as a Typhoon pilot, even brought down a V1 rocket!) who, four months before he retired, told us how important to become your own severe teacher and let ourselves be reprimanded by our sixth sense. Example, climbing into the clouds, rate of climb 30,000 ft per min. and not properly using your radar or paying EXTREMELY close attention to ground control about traffic into which corridor you’ll be crossing on your way up to angel sixty… It hurts even more when an airliner radios in and asks about the cowboy that just zip 1/2 of a mile in front of his bird in a 80 degree hardclimb… and the offending pilot didn’t see him!!! (I can’t claim “credit” on this particular dozy, another newly arrived pilot pulled that one, but I have my share of “Ooops”…). He stated afterwards that he did see the approaching liner on the radar, but figured his rate of climb was sufficient to allow a separation of at least 2 miles… Ground had advised the airliner of the scrambling fighter on their 12, but took too long to see the rapidly diminishing distance between the two aircrafts. Only after the fighter had passed close to the airliner did the Ground control warned the fighter. It became my job afterwards to “debrief” the young officer on this close call by reminding him that although HIS rate of climb had been considered and factored in, he had NOT taken into consideration that the airliner was NOT standing still and was moving forward at 300 KIAS, thus rapidly cutting the distance. The only proper course would have been to bring his aircraft to the right and move away immediately OUT of the corridor the airliner was using as soon as he his radard gave him indication of a collision course instead of relying on his ROC and ignoring the traffic advisory given by Ground control. Also his angle of climb was unnecessary steep, a climbing angle of 60 degrees would have done the same thing and brought him to his intercept coordinates just as quickly and safely… Live and learn…

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