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Comments on: More Murdering Scumbags http://www.nicedoggie.net/2007/?p=889 Tue, 16 Jan 2018 23:44:45 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.3.2 By: Sir Guido Cabrone, LC, M.o.P. http://www.nicedoggie.net/2007/?p=889#comment-36047 Sir Guido Cabrone, LC, M.o.P. Thu, 02 Aug 2007 02:16:12 +0000 http://www.nicedoggie.net/2007/?p=889#comment-36047 <strong>Psychochick</strong> <blockquote>How many parts does that Garand have?</blockquote> A lot. But not as many as some other weapons. Also, keep in mind that Fulton sells all of the little bits that you never even really think about as an owner. Normally a Garand, (or other military rifle), is stripped to sub-assemblies.) eg. trigger group, barrel and receiver group, stock group, bolt group. Now, I know that the above is techno-babble for you, if you are interested in learning more about the subject, I would suggest finding a copy of Edward Ezell's "Small Arms of the World". If you get a copy, block out a few days for absorbing it. (The book is about three inches thick and full (8x11) sized.) With a good binding, it would serve as a weapon all by itself. :em99: This is a subject that is far too involved to be covered in a blog post. I have customers come in and ask me about a particular weapon, or bring in something that they can't identify so that I can tell them what it is. When I answer the question, or tell them what they have, they invariably ask "How do you know all this stuff?" followed by "How can I learn all this?". I tell them to spend thirty years studying the subject, buying guns, selling guns, fixing guns, looking at guns... About then their eyes go blank and they say "Never mind." Firearms are a complex subject, and we never manage to learn all there is to know about them. They've been around for nearly seven hundred years now, and have been making major changes for most of that. There are people that know the subject better than I do around here, (<strong>Masterguns</strong> comes to mind), if you ask him, you'll get something close to the same answer, (only I think with a longer time span quoted...) Strict Standards: call_user_func_array() expects parameter 1 to be a valid callback, non-static method emotions::filter_text() should not be called statically in /home/misha/public_html/2007/wp-includes/plugin.php on line 59

Psychochick

How many parts does that Garand have?

A lot. But not as many as some other weapons. Also, keep in mind that Fulton sells all of the little bits that you never even really think about as an owner. Normally a Garand, (or other military rifle), is stripped to sub-assemblies.) eg. trigger group, barrel and receiver group, stock group, bolt group.

Now, I know that the above is techno-babble for you, if you are interested in learning more about the subject, I would suggest finding a copy of Edward Ezell’s “Small Arms of the World”. If you get a copy, block out a few days for absorbing it. (The book is about three inches thick and full (8×11) sized.) With a good binding, it would serve as a weapon all by itself. :em99:

This is a subject that is far too involved to be covered in a blog post. I have customers come in and ask me about a particular weapon, or bring in something that they can’t identify so that I can tell them what it is. When I answer the question, or tell them what they have, they invariably ask “How do you know all this stuff?” followed by “How can I learn all this?”. I tell them to spend thirty years studying the subject, buying guns, selling guns, fixing guns, looking at guns…

About then their eyes go blank and they say “Never mind.”

Firearms are a complex subject, and we never manage to learn all there is to know about them. They’ve been around for nearly seven hundred years now, and have been making major changes for most of that.

There are people that know the subject better than I do around here, (Masterguns comes to mind), if you ask him, you’ll get something close to the same answer, (only I think with a longer time span quoted…)

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